workplace bullying and mobbing

Crisis Prevention: Bill 168 became law on June 15, 2010, and it represents a significant change in how, and to what extent, both workplace violence and workplace harassment are regulated in Ontario. It also broadens the definitions of workplace violence and places new requirements on Ontario employers. Ontario Bill 168, Occupational Health and Safety Amendment Act (Violence and Harassment in the Workplace) 2009

Kenneth Westhues: In the view of some commentators, overconcern with workplace bullying (mobbing, too, in so far as it involves hurt feelings) has relegated to the sidelines what should be front and centre in any workplace: getting the work done well. In 2006, a large award by a British court to a victim of harassment by co-workers sparked intense debate over who, in fact, got taken advantage of by whom. In his 2007 essay on “The Hypersensitive Workplace.” David Butcher argues that there is an important line, however elusive, between rudeness and harassment, support and handholding. In a trenchant entry on his Scientific Misconduct Blog, Aubrey Blumsohn laments a situation where “civility, decorum and status” displace genuine ethics. Research and public concern about both bullying and mobbing will doubtless continue, and so will a certain difference of “feel” between the two fields of inquiry. Scholars who prefer to talk about bullying will continue to be a little wary of those who prefer to talk about mobbing, and vice versa. This webpage has been intended to clarify the reasons for that wariness, and to help readers situate themselves in the debate. Bullying vs. Mobbing: a Difference of Priorities and Outlook

Workplace Mental Health Promotion: It is the legal duty of an employer to protect the mental and physical health of employees. That means protection from harassment, violence and bullying. Across Canada, there has been a major push through legislative amendments to make employers more accountable for fostering mentally safe work environments. This push is backed by case law which has found employers liable for exposing employees to unsafe work environments that have caused unnecessary psychological harm. Harassment, Violence, Bullying and Mobbing

Wikipedia: Workplace bullying, like childhood bullying, is the tendency of individuals or groups to use persistent aggressive or unreasonable behaviour against a co-worker or subordinate. Workplace bullying can include such tactics as verbal, nonverbal, psychological, physical abuse and humiliation. This type of aggression is particularly difficult because, unlike the typical forms of school bullying, workplace bullies often operate within the established rules and policies of their organization and their society. Bullying in the workplace is in the majority of cases reported as having been perpetrated by management and takes a wide variety of forms. Bullying can be covert or overt. Workplace bullying

RELATED READING: 5 phases of the mobbing process
What is Workplace Bullying?
What Can I Do About Workplace Bullying?
Bully Free At Work: The Facts on Workplace Bullying
Vicious Cycle of Workplace Bullying
How workplace bullying affects targeted persons
Comprehensive Workplace Health Promotion – Affecting Mental Health in Workplace
mobbing.ca

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